Page 1 of 5

who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 8:30 am
by noth
click here for the article
A teenager was jailed yesterday for refusing to hand over his computer password to police during an investigation.

Fast-food worker Oliver Drage, 19, was taken to court after police tried to search his PC after a tip-off only to find it locked with a 50-character encrypted code.

Officers investigating a child exploitation racket ordered Drage to disclose the password hoping the contents of his computer might help their inquiries - but the teenager refused. He was then prosecuted for failing to disclose an encryption key.
can you IMAGINE typing in a FIFTY character password each time? who would do it? :o

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 11:26 am
by PlanetStyles.net
noth wrote:who would do it? :o
The full story reported on BBC News discloses the reason behind his probing. It's not uncommon for people involved in sick practices to use long, encrypted passwords, for this reason especially: They (and only they) have access.

No doubt there's a wealth of evidence on his computer, which (if / when recovered) will inevitably lead to a lengthy prison sentence.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 5:29 pm
by nuckfan15
Isn't there a way to bypass passwords. I always thought there must be a backdoor somewhere. ( And I am not talking using F8.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 5:31 pm
by Erik Frèrejean
noth wrote:can you IMAGINE typing in a FIFTY character password each time? who would do it? :o
You've got password managers for that, no need to type it every time ;).

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 8:37 am
by Saldash
nuckfan15 wrote:Isn't there a way to bypass passwords. I always thought there must be a backdoor somewhere. ( And I am not talking using F8.
Yes and no, depends on how/where the information is stored, and using which software.
If the information stored is protected merely through windows authentication, then it can easily be torn out by specialist software. If third party tools were used, it can be much trickier.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 4:40 pm
by Rahber
50 character password :shock:
thats funny that poilce is asking for the password from the user , don't they have specialist to do that :roll:
and if its windows password there are many ways to break the windows authentication as well as bios password :lol:

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 6:09 pm
by willem123456
Yes and the encryption of windows-passwords is already known on the whole world.
The police is dumb :lol:

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 6:47 pm
by Kim_Possible
I'm guessing that he is using something like TrueCrypt to encrypt the entire disk/partition. If so, there is no easy "work around" for not having the pass phrase. I've had two laptops stolen in my life, both of which had fairly sensitive work-related data on them. I use TrueCrypt religiously (also, my pass phrase is 39 characters long ;) ).

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 6:54 pm
by god0fgod
No, it's an encryption key. You'll only have access to the data with the correct key and this key should (but could be) not be stored anywhere on the computer. Cracking the key can't be done easily as you can see in this example. Brute-forcing 50 characters would take a long time. If it only had 0-9 and a-z there is 36 characters per character possible. This gives 6533186235000709060966902671580578205371437104729548715430719663694971414773
76 possibilities. :o

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:17 pm
by AdamR
If the password software only accepts ASCII characters, there's a total of 2.29349862 × 10^105 possible combinations. To put that number in perspective, if you lined up that many protons, it would cover with width of the universe (156 billion light years, at current estimates) 1.55402678 × 10^63 times. ;)

If, however, it accepts UTF-8, that number becomes insanely larger.

- Adam

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:31 pm
by Kim_Possible
If I remember correctly, the Truecrypt font end for Linux that I use only allows ASCII characters with a maximum pass phrase length of 64 characters. Realistically, for a pre-boot auth pass phrase where typing in the password is the standard method for booting, you have about 90+ characters you can easily enter with the keyboard (mine has 94). . . far more than necessary to create an encryption key that is practically "unbreakable." It is certainly strong enough to protect my data from the mugger who took my 'puter.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:03 pm
by god0fgod
AdamR wrote:If the password software only accepts ASCII characters, there's a total of 2.29349862 × 10^105 possible combinations. To put that number in perspective, if you lined up that many protons, it would cover with width of the universe (156 billion light years, at current estimates) 1.55402678 × 10^63 times. ;)

If, however, it accepts UTF-8, that number becomes insanely larger.

- Adam
How did you get to 2.29349862 × 10^105?

If it had 94 of the ASCII codes then it would be 94^50 or 400542299890603122922964317822277742838996381965224558
3807442596031897678448951789674509453711518990336

Edit: I see now that you put your answer into standard form.

The posts needs to use word-wrap.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:28 am
by noth
I thought that the password they were talking about - was the password that your computer asks for when "starting" the computer up

many lap tops allows the lap top owner to partition the use into 2 users, 3 users, 4 users

each user can have no password or set a password

from what I'm reading above this is not the password in question, is that right? :shock:

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 3:23 pm
by Kim_Possible
noth wrote:from what I'm reading above this is not the password in question, is that right? :shock:
The article doesn't specify exactly, but it does use the word "encryption" and indicates that a government agency has been trying to "crack" it for several months. I don't think the standard user account protection offered by operating systems would prove to be that difficult to bypass. My assumption is that the owner has used some sort of robust method of encryption to protect his data . . . or access to his entire operating system.

Re: who uses a 50 character password?

Posted: Sun Oct 10, 2010 3:43 pm
by MichaelC
noth wrote:I thought that the password they were talking about - was the password that your computer asks for when "starting" the computer up

many lap tops allows the lap top owner to partition the use into 2 users, 3 users, 4 users

each user can have no password or set a password

from what I'm reading above this is not the password in question, is that right? :shock:
Its talking about an encryption key for a hard drive partition.