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Pluto - A Planet no more

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:40 am
by sempai
Pluto stripped of its status as a planet

There is much heated debate on the discussion of Pluto. Back in my primary years, the solar system has been my favorite subject. Ever since then, there isn't much information on pluto over the years. Do you think exlusion of the farthest planet would it change our view of the solar system? Science teachers would say in the future that Pluto was once called a "planet".

Any thoughts? :)

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:59 am
by karlsemple
seems odd to think something i was taught at school not so long back may then turn out not to be the case....you have it drummed into your head for so long its going to seem odd.

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:16 am
by lurttinen
Looks like the article missed out the object named UB313. Commonly known as "Xena"
Xena is also bigger than pluto so that is what caused them to rearrange the terms of planets

The Pluto is still there, Only the definition has changed.

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 8:22 am
by starfoxtj
Bah its been thought of as a planet so long they should keep its status!

But really, a planet is a subjective term that fits into a set critera, what stops them from revising the critera again in the near future? Might as well just leave it as is instead of having to reprint billions of books that say its a planet.

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 10:21 am
by battye
starfoxtj wrote: Bah its been thought of as a planet so long they should keep its status!


There is no scientific reasoning behind that, but I fully agree with you.

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:01 pm
by Nephrus
In school, we were taught that Pluto was a planet, or a dwarf planet at least. So not sure why it was removed, but I'm not a scientist/astronomer so I can't provide anything further than that.

Should've at least been called a planet since it had been called one for so long.

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 10:18 pm
by Newfie
The old saying:

"My very educated mother just served us nine pizzas"

would become

"My very educated mother just served us nachos"

or something like that

Anyone remember that?

With that mentality, shouldn't Rhode Island no longer be a state or PEI no longer be a province?

Posted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 11:14 pm
by niksa
If we kept everything the same for the sake of tradition, or because "that's how we were taught" then nothing would progress!

Pluto is a minor planetary body... it's a part of the Kuiper belt. It's just as important as "Xena" or any of the other Kuiper belt objects. In the 1800s, we used to classify Ceres, an asteroid between Mars and Jupiter as a planet too. We got over it. ;)

Posted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:56 am
by dsprvd
Heh I hope my teacher knows about this or I am bound to flunk this grade!

Posted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 8:18 am
by lazyleo
Thank God! I Finished school...

Posted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 9:51 am
by Newfie
The giant space rocks, whatever you call them, are still there as they are, it's more so an opinion about what is and isn't a planet.

Instead of planets, asteroids, meteors, comets, etc. maybe we should just call all of them "giant space rocks". That oughta clear it up for the astronomers who have a hard time making up their minds about what category each giant space rock would fit in. :lol:

Posted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 7:30 pm
by palmirabase.net
Meh, my science teacher says they change their minds every 10-15 years... :roll:

Posted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:02 pm
by Anon
Nephrus wrote: So not sure why it was removed, but I'm not a scientist/astronomer so I can't provide anything further than that.


Because it is too small to be considered a full planet, and other forms larger than it are not. However I support changing it, since if it was never an actual planet, what's the point in addressing it as one? If we change it's status, future generations at least will not see it as a planet, so we'll forget about it completly

Posted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:29 pm
by smithy_dll
It's a great outcome, and a huge win for science.

Science is about discovery. And now that we have an actual definition of what a planet is, we can go on discovering and classifying celestial bodies that are out there, both in our solar system, and others.

Remember, Pluto was only discovered in 1930, and at that time we thought it was much larger than it really is. In science we learn more about something, and we re-classify it if we need to. For example, we ourselves are all animals, it cannot be denied.

There is so much we do not know about our solar system, and projects such as the hubble space telescope have allowed us to learn so much more about our solar system, and the universe at large. There is still alot to learn out there for a long time yet. 8)

Posted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 1:37 am
by Vanderloogen
I think it's just about a group of dudes who want to make a name for themselves